Robotic Parking System Verified as Highest Throughput Capacity in the Automatic Parking Industry

Robotic Parking System at Al Jahra, KuwaitRobotic Parking Systems Inc., a Pinellas Park, Florida based company, announced the successful throughput testing of its recently completed 2,350 capacity Al Jahra Court Automatic Parking System in Kuwait. TÜV Nord certified a peak traffic throughput capacity of 425 cars per hour. Throughput capacity is the total number of cars per hour that can be handled in a combination of inbound and outbound vehicle traffic. Additionally, the average retrieval time for a single vehicle was verified as 177 seconds.

Robotic Parking System at Al Jahra Kuwait

“The peak traffic throughput measurement is much more critical in the day to day operations of an automated garage than a single vehicle retrieval time. No other manufacturer in the automatic parking industry has this level of performance verification by an independent third party. We met and exceeded the contractual performance requirements of 400 cars per hour throughput and single retrieval time of 220 seconds,” said Royce Monteverdi, CEO of Robotic Parking Systems Inc.

With this record, Robotic Parking Systems has positioned itself not only as the largest automatic parking facility in the world but also as the manufacturer with the highest peak traffic capacity worldwide. The Al Jahra Court facility surpasses the Emirates Financial Tower garage in Dubai (designed and manufactured by Robotic Parking Systems) that achieved the Guinness World Record as the largest automatic garage with 1,200 parking spaces in 2011.

Juergen Bauer, Chairman of Robotic Parking Systems Inc., emphasized “Robotic Parking Systems has demonstrated the viability of its patented lift-and-run system over and over again. Today, with more than 5,000 units built, the company is the strongest market participant in the Western Hemisphere and perfectly positioned for the North American market. With its latest adaptation to emerging technologies – CASE: Connectivity, Autonomous Driving, Sharing and Services and Electrification – Robotic Parking Systems is well aligned with Smart City applications.”

Click here for a copy of the certificate.

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Building a 2350 Space Robotic Parking Garage – Part 3

Robotic Parking Systems‘ robust, durable and safety-compliant industrial lifts transport cars from one level to another in our automated parking garage. We call these industrial lifts (composed of a deck, a drive and counterweights) Vertical Lift Conveyors (VLC) .

“These industrial lifts are a purely electromechanical design with long lasting chain drive and variable frequency drives that allow speed adjustments,” stated Royce Monteverdi, CEO. “They are also equipped with safety locks and other electronics that allow safe operation in a fully automated parking application,” he added.

Once the frames for VLC components are fabricated, they are primed and painted with high-quality, long-lasting industrial paints.

Robotic Parking Systems' VLC Counterweights
Robotic Parking Systems’ VLC Counterweights are painted.

 

Robotic Parking Systems' VLC Drive
Painting the Robotic Parking Systems’ VLC Drive frame.

 

VLC Deck Ready for Assembly
After painting, the VLC Decks are ready for assembly to begin.

 

Robotic Parking Systems' VLC Deck
Robotic Parking Systems’ VLC Deck machines painted and stacked in preparation for mechanical assembly.

 

 

 

 

Building a 2350 Space Robotic Parking Garage – Part 1

In just nine (9) months, Robotic Parking Systems manufactured, tested and shipped a record setting 210 machines for a new 2350 space automated parking facility.

This is the first of a multi-part series that will take you through the entire process of fabricating, assembling, testing, shipping and installing the machinery, automation components and electronics for this robotic parking garage.

Beginning in April 2014 with a bill of material consisting of about 2500 individual items, tens of thousands of parts and materials were ordered and began flooding into our manufacturing plant. Our vendors worked closely with us and were vital to our meeting an incredibly tight production schedule despite normally long lead times.

Robotic Parking Systems precision milling

Royce Monteverdi, CEO, stated, “Precision milling is critical in the fabrication of Robotic Parking Systems’ machinery. The fabrication teams must hold to very tight tolerances that are required for the assembly of the machines.”

Shipments began in September 2014 and by early January 2015 about 1300 tons of machinery, electronics and materials were shipped out in 98 ocean freight containers.

The installation crew began arriving on site in November 2014 to oversee the off loading of the machinery and electronics. Installation is in progress, and we’ll announce details about the project as we near the completion and opening of the facility.

Robotic Parking Systems’ ParkSmart Newsletter – Issue 32 Available Online

Robotic Parking Systems’ ParkSmart Newsletter – Issue 32 is now available on line. In this issue we cover:

  • MACHINES FOR 2350 SPACE ROBOTIC GARAGE SHIP – Robotic Parking Systems Inc manufactured and shipped 210 automated parking machines for a 2350 space parking facility.
  • PALLET VS NON-PALLET SYSTEMS –  Pallets are a major factor in the reduction of product liability since they prevent drippings and ensure no machinery touches the car.
  • PREMIUM VALET SERVICE – Robotic Parking Systems offer the convenience of premium valet service without the valet.
  • REDUCE TOXINS AND POLLUTANTS  – Did you know that tire and brake dust pollutants are more toxic than all the exhaust related emissions combined?
  • ON THE WEB – Access to product and technical information, photos, videos, brochures and more.
  • PARKING FACTS – Little known facts about transportation and the parking industry.

When is Robotic Parking not Robotic Parking?

In the 1990s automated parking was still largely just a discussion about possibilities. While there were some old “mechanical garages” in New York and New Jersey, to most people in the parking industry, a robotic garage was one where the entry and exit gates went up and down automatically. The concept of a software system running a garage was still futuristic.

Robotic Parking Systems High Peak Traffic

This was the environment in 1994, when Royce Monteverdi coined the term “robotic parking” and established Robotic Parking Systems, Inc. Monteverdi developed the “Lift and Run” system, a software controlled system that ran three separate sets of machines, for the x, y and z axes, to take a car from an entry bay to an upper level, park it, and bring it back to the gate or terminal on demand.

The Lift and Run system, integrating mechanical capability with software control, was a monumental breakthrough in the parking industry. As the New York Times mentioned in 2000, Robotic Parking Systems’ working garage in Hoboken, NJ was the country’s first fully automatic garage.

In the following decade, the term “robotic parking” was picked up and used by others entering the field. Today it has become a generic term for the type of software controlled automatic parking system pioneered by Monteverdi.

And of course, as with any new technology, those entering the field have attempted to bring other technologies into the field, or innovate on the original concepts, with varying degrees of success.

News occasionally comes across our plates about a “robotic parking” garage having difficulty retrieving cars promptly, even some with much smaller capacities than the garages built by Robotic Parking Systems. The use of the term robotic parking should not be interpreted to mean that these garages are using the Robotic Parking Systems technology, which includes the patented Lift and Run system and Robotic Parking Systems proprietary software.

To date we have not seen an alternative system that has been able to match or exceed Robotic Parking Systems’ peak traffic rates of delivery.

The Robotic Parking Systems garage in Dubai, for example, was tested in 2009 and delivered 252 cars per hour; more than four cars per minute, at peak traffic times. The garage the company is currently building will deliver more than 500 cars per hour at peak traffic.

This is not the first time that an original name has been picked up and used across an industry. Escalators were once the proprietary invention of the Otis Elevator Company. We all know how Xerox and Kleenex became generic terms.

Whatever confusion is created by seeing “robotic parking” in a headline of a story that has nothing to do with Robotic Parking Systems, Inc., we are proud that, like Xerox and Kleenex, Robotic Parking Systems continues to provide the benchmarks and performance standards we came out of the (robotic) starting gate with in 1994.