Robotic Parking Systems at ENCON2 in Kuwait

Robotic Parking Systems‘ CEO, Royce Monteverdi, participated in ENCON2 (2nd Consulting Services for the Development Plan Forum) held 30 April – 2 May 2019 in Kuwait.

The event was sponsored by the Federation of Kuwaiti Engineering Offices & Consultant Houses under the patronage of His Excellency Sheikh Nasser Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Sabah, First Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Defense – Chairman of the Supreme Council for Planning and Development.

Robotic Parking Systems at ENCON2 in Kuwait. The event was under the partonage of His Excellency Sheikh Nasser Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Sabah, First Deputy Prime Minister.

ENCON2 was aimed at boosting efficiency by which the phases of Kuwait’s 2035 Development Plan are executed. Its goal is ensuring that projects are executed accurately according to specifications and within their budgets. Shortening the documentary cycle and significantly limiting variation orders to boost transparency and combat corruption were among the hot topics of ENCON2.

Architectural Model of Robotic Parking Systems at Al Jahra Kuwait

Cutaway of Robotic Parking Systems at Al Jahra Kuwait

Additionally, participants discussed the best approach to implement Kuwait’s government vision of empowering the private consulting sector to assume the roles of approvals and permissions issuance and execution of projects of the Development Plan, as well as the best approach to empower the government agencies to carry out an effective supervisory role only.

Robotic Parking Systems at ENCON2 in Kuwait

The architectural models above show the automated parking system at the Al Jahra Court Complex in Kuwait. This system currently holds the Guinness World Record for the largest automated parking facility in the world.

For more information, visit www.roboticparking.com.

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ParkSmart Issue 38 – Robotic Parking Systems Newsletter

Robotic Parking Systems’ newsletter – ParkSmart Issue 38 – is now available on line. Click to see your copy.

ParkSmart-Issue38-sm

What makes a Robotic Parking System more “green” or environmentally friendly?

reduce carbon footprint - reduce pollutants

Robotic Parking Systems offers a more eco-friendly parking solution by:

(a) Using 50% less space to park the same number of cars as a conventional garage. Land used affects sustainability issues such as development density and maximizing open space. Use less space for parking allows architects and developers to  incorporate more green space and open areas. Plus, less space used for parking creates space for higher revenue usage.

(b) Reducing traffic congestion and accompanying pollution. Multiple studies have reported that 30% to 50% of traffic congestion in city centers is generated by drivers searching for a parking space. An efficient automated parking system allows placement of parking in convenient areas not workable for larger conventional parking.

(c) Reducing pollution inside the garage by using electro-mechanical automated parking machinery to move cars into parking spaces. No cars run inside the garage, and there is no driving up and down ramps and through aisles in search of a space. This significantly reduces the emissions of harmful gases, reduces the carbon footprint, increases carbon credits and ensures an environmentally clean parking facility.

Tire and brake dust are more toxic than all the exhaust related emissions. In a 750 space Robotic Parking System 37 tons of tire dust and 3.7 tons of brake dust pollutants are eliminated by using electro-mechanical machinery to move cars inside the garage.

(d) A review of LEED for New Construction & Major Renovations shows that a project which includes a Robotic Parking System could receive at least 10 points and as many as 17 points toward certification.

Congestion: Myth 5

Myth:
Autonomous vehicles (AVs) will soon arrive and will reduce congestion.

Reality:
Fully autonomous (Society of Automotive Engineers Level 5) vehicles won’t reach widespread adoption until long after 2030.

Automobile and technology companies will continue to launch numerous AV pilots, but they must clear a significant number of hurdles. There are significant advancements needed in both the technology and cost. AVs will operate in limited setting for some time and cost will remain a major barrier—premium buyers and fleets will remain the primary market for AVs for some time. Once prices do come down, it will still take a long time to replace a meaningful share of the current vehicle base. There are also significant legal and ethical questions related to liability. Lastly, there are questions around how standards and infrastructure develop and who will pay for them.

Once mainstream, it’s still up for debate whether AVs will reduce or worsen congestion. The outcome hinges on a few factors: cost, riders’ willingness to share, and AVs effect on urban sprawl. It is highly possible that AV’s will induce demand for transportation due to the convenience of AVs that could increase urban sprawl and VMT.

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Robotic Parking Systems has been participating in transportation technology discussions with leading companies for quite some time. One element has become very clear – emerging technologies require that the garage of the future be smart!

Our system is already connected and can receive and share as much or as little information as the owner wants on an open network.This communications platform works well for car sharing fleets, etc.

We have developed a partnership with Bosch to facilitate the parking of “autonomous driving cars” in Robotic Parking Systems’ garages. And, with optional electric charging stations, Robotic Parking Systems Inc offers the features in parking facilities required for future transportation needs.

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The National Parking Association commissioned a top-10 consulting firm to produce a report on reducing congestion. The result: “Parking is a solution to congestion.”

The report, “An Ecosystem Approach to Reducing Congestion,” reaffirms the role of parking in our cities. For the full study, visit WeAreParking.org/Congestion

© 2018 PwC. All rights reserved. Produced with the participation of the National Parking Association

Congestion: Myth 4

Manhattan congestion

Myth:
Current parking policies are effective at setting the right parking supply and reducing congestion.

Reality:

Current parking minimums lead to an oversupply of parking and induce driving, increasing congestion.

Cities could consider reducing or eliminating regulations that force builders to include a minimum number of parking spaces in new real estate developments. These policies create an oversupply in parking and can leave facilities under-utilized. Further it adds additional cost for developers — increasing the total building development cost.

On-street parking prices are not always set to market rates, which may induce circling, and drive congestion. A combination of setting market rates and introducing new parking technologies – to monitor the availability of spaces in real time – could cut down on miles driven while waiting for one to open up.

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Robotic Parking Systems can provide automated parking garages at least 50-60% smaller than typical concrete ramp garages while providing the same number of parking spaces. This allows for easier placement of garages in existing cities and could potentially replace on-street parking.

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The National Parking Association commissioned a top-10 consulting firm to
produce a
report on reducing congestion. The result: “Parking is a
solution to congestion.”

The report, “An Ecosystem Approach to Reducing Congestion,” reaffirms the role
of  parking in our cities. For the full study, visit WeAreParking.org/Congestion

© 2018 PwC. All rights reserved.
Produced with the participation of the National Parking Association

Congestion: Myth 3

traffic congestion

Myth:
Expensive, long-term capital projects are the best way to address congestion.

Reality:
No single solution can solve congestion. Both near- and long-term solutions should be used to combat congestion.

A holistic view must be taken when looking at congestion. There is a backlog of $90B in deferred public transit maintenance and replacement projects. Upgrading infrastructure alone is a challenging feat. Policy levers and other demand shifting policies may help to mitigate congestion in the short term and are often less expensive than large capital infrastructure projects. At the same time, capital projects increase transportation capacity (e.g., public transport, roadways, and highways) and are necessary to accommodate for population and economic growth in the long term.

——————————-

The National Parking Association commissioned a top-10 consulting firm to
produce a
report on reducing congestion. The result: “Parking is a
solution to congestion.”

The report, “An Ecosystem Approach to Reducing Congestion,” reaffirms the role
of  parking in our cities. For the full study, visit WeAreParking.org/Congestion

© 2018 PwC. All rights reserved.
Produced with the participation of the National Parking Association

Congestion: Myth 2

Myth:
E-commerce has a zero net effect on congestion.

Reality:
Online shopping is putting more delivery trucks on the road and increasing congestion, particularly at the curb.

It was long thought that the rise of e-commerce would be, at worst, neutral in terms of congestion. The theory was that any increase in delivery truck traffic would be more than offset by a reduction in solo trips to the mall in private vehicles. Changes in consumer behavior enabled by e-commerce have upended this expectation, however. Fast, free shipping, which has become the standard for online sellers, has not only increased orders but also raised the number of single package deliveries. In addition, about 30% of online orders end up being returned, compared to 9% for traditional sales. This creates extra trips. The problem is particularly acute in neighborhoods where congestion is already bad, like urban cores. There, delivery companies compete for space at the curb, often double parking and obstructing traffic.

——————————-

The National Parking Association commissioned a top-10 consulting firm to produce a
report on reducing congestion. The result: “Parking is a solution to congestion.”

The report, “An Ecosystem Approach to Reducing Congestion,” reaffirms the role of
parking in our cities. For the full study, visit WeAreParking.org/Congestion

© 2018 PwC. All rights reserved.
Produced with the participation of the National Parking Association